Analysis: M’s acquire Martin, Bass

In another trade that swapped some probability for club control and added outfield defense, the Seattle Mariners have acquired Leonys Martin and swing reliever Anthony Bass in exchange for right-hander Tom Wilhelmsen, outfielder James Jones and a player to be named. And no, the player to be named isn’t Taijuan Walker, or even Roenis Elias or D.J. Peterson. The Mariners get a top-half glove in center field in Martin, 28 in March, who struggled at the plate in 2015 — .219/.264/.313 — due to a rather curious fall in BABIP…

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Concerns on M’s lack of Triple-A depth

One of the first things mentioned by new Seattle Mariners general manager Jerry Dipoto upon his hiring was how the club lacked general depth, particularly in the upper minors. Many clubs welcomed impact and contributing rookies to their rosters this past season. But Seattle’s inability to develop talent at the higher minor league levels during Jack Zduriencik’s tenure nearly left the Mariners out of the aptly named ‘year of the rookie’ in 2015. Ketel Marte and Carson Smith were major league contributors as rookies though Seattle didn’t have a Kris…

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Plans for Jones and Romero

  With just under 40 games remaining in t Luke ArkinsLuke is a native New Yorker, who grew up a Mets fan. After the US Navy moved him to the Pacific Northwest in 2009, he decided to make Seattle his home. In 2014, Luke joined the Prospect Insider team and is now a contributor at HERO Sports also. During baseball season, he can be often found observing the local team at Safeco Field. You can follow Luke on Twitter @luke_arkins More from Prospect Insider Mariners At Memorial Day: AL West…

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M’s change up pitching staff

With a return of Hisashi Iwakuma from the disabled list expected to take place on Monday, the Seattle Mariners sent three pitchers to Triple-A Tacoma after Friday night’s vicotry. Starter Roenis Elias was optioned — to make room in the rotation for Iwakuma — as well as relievers Tom Wilhelmsen and Vidal Nuno. The three players called-up to fill the roster spots include relievers David Rollins and Mayckol Guaipe and outfielder James Jones. Iwakuma, out since April with a strained back muscle, has not been officially re-called yet. But there is no…

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How Mariners can “right” ship

The best word to describe the Seattle Mariners offense may be “enigmatic.” That’s been especially true in the month of June. During 14 games this month, the team has scored two or fewer runs – including four shutouts – in nine games, while scoring five or more runs in three other games. The end result is a team with a 5-9 win-loss record and an increasingly frustrated fan base. This level of offensive unevenness isn’t a new challenge for an organization that’s sputtered at the plate for over a half-decade.…

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Can’t argue with results

When I served in the Navy, I had the privilege of working with a superb aircraft maintenance officer and a dynamic leader who was simply known throughout Naval Aviation as “Big John.” On one particular occasion the unit that I was leading had endured a series of discouraging events, but we eventually bounced back and succeeded when it really mattered. When I talked to John about the difficulties leading up to our eventual success, he simply said that you “can’t argue with results.” John’s philosophy was simple – all that…

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What’s ailing Mariners’ lineup?

The Seattle Mariners have a 15-17 record after their first 32 games – which happens to be the 20-percent mark of their 2015 season – and it’s been a bumpy ride for a team that was projected to be a serious World Series contender by many national pundits. With such a small sample size of data, it’s still too early to put much credence into the statistical aspect of the team’s struggles. With that said, comparing a 20-percent sample against a player’s career history may help clarify a fan’s expectations…

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The value of stolen bases

Offensive production in major league baseball has dropped sharply over the past decade. The most frequently suggested causes behind this decline are an aggressive performance-enhancing drug testing, the implementation of state-of-the-art analysis on hitters’ tendencies, rising pitch velocities, increased relief pitcher specialization, and more defensive shifts. Regardless of the cause behind the offensive swoon, teams are seeing fewer hitters reach base. League-average on-base percentage (OBP) in recent years harkens back to the levels that prompted Major League Baseball to lower the pitcher’s mound in 1969. You have to go back…

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